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qaiie 2018, 3(1): 149-186 Back to browse issues page
A Comparative Study of Social Thinking in Allameh Tabataba'i and Lipman’s Views and its Implications for Philosophy for Children (P4C)
Seyyed Mansour Marashi 1, Jafar Cheraghian 2, Masoud Safaei Moghaddam 3, Parvaneh Valavi 4
1- Associate Professor of Philosophy of Education, Faculty of Psychology and Education, Sahid Chamran University of Ahvaz. Iran. , marashi_s@scu.ac.ir
2- Ph.D. in Philosophy of Education, Faculty of Psychology and Education, Sahid Chamran University of Ahvaz. Iran.
3- Professor of Philosophy of Education, Faculty of Psychology and Education, Sahid Chamran University of Ahvaz. Iran.
4- Assistant Professor of Philosophy of Education, Faculty of Psychology and Education, Sahid Chamran University of Ahvaz. Iran.
Abstract:   (269 Views)
The purpose of this research was to compare and analyze views of Matthew Lipman, as the originator of P4C, and those of Allameh Tabataba'i on social thinking and to discover commonalities and differences between them in order to make the best use of P4C in the formal and public education system of the Islamic Republic of Iran. The statistical population of the study comprised all works, documents and databases containing Allameh Tabataba'i and Lipman’s views on social thinking. These sources were first identified and then studied purposefully and thoroughly. Next, the obtained data were analyzed through analytical-inferential-comparative methods and this was continuously and simultaneously carried out with data collection. The findings indicated that Lipman and Allameh Tabataba'i have similar perspectives on "attention to individuality while accepting social dignity", "belief in prominent position of thinking and rationality in social interactions", "focus on dialogues" and "rejection of moral relativism". Differences between these two thinkers include "placing great emphasis on method of enquiry by Lipman versus giving great importance to gaining knowledge by Allameh" and "dominance of thinking in Lipman’s paradigm and faith in that of Allameh". The implications of this research are to strive for the promotion of a dialogue-based approach to education and to avoid impeding critical and free thinking.
Keywords: thinking, social thinking, Allameh Tabataba'i, Matthew Lipman, Philosophy for Children.
Full-Text [PDF 563 kb]   (89 Downloads)    
Type of Study: Research | Subject: special-Philosophical
Received: 2018/02/15 | Accepted: 2018/05/31 | Published: 2018/11/30
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Marashi S M, Cheraghian J, Safaei Moghaddam M, Valavi P. A Comparative Study of Social Thinking in Allameh Tabataba'i and Lipman’s Views and its Implications for Philosophy for Children (P4C) . qaiie. 2018; 3 (1) :149-186
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Volume 3, Issue 1 (4-2018) Back to browse issues page
فصلنامه علمی پژوهشی مسائل کاربردی تعلیم و تربیت اسلامی Quarterly Journal of Applied Issues in Islamic Education
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